The great gatsby from daisy s point

Located at the end of the Buchanans' dock, this green light represents Gatsby's ultimate aspiration:

The great gatsby from daisy s point

The men who live here work at shoveling up the ashes. Overhead, two huge, blue, spectacle-rimmed eyes—the last vestige of an advertising gimmick by a long-vanished eye doctor—stare down from an enormous sign. These unblinking eyes, the eyes of Doctor T.

Eckleburg, watch over everything that happens in the valley of ashes. The commuter train that runs between West Egg and New York passes through the valley, making several stops along the way. One day, as Nick and Tom are riding the train into the city, Tom forces Nick to follow him out of the train at one of these stops.

Wilson is a lifeless yet handsome man, colored gray by the ashes in the air. In contrast, Myrtle has a kind of desperate vitality; she strikes Nick as sensuous despite her stocky figure. Tom taunts Wilson and then orders Myrtle to follow him to the train. Catherine has bright red hair, wears a great deal of makeup, and tells Nick that she has heard that Jay Gatsby is the nephew or cousin of Kaiser Wilhelm, the ruler of Germany during World War I.

The McKees, who live downstairs, are a horrid couple: McKee is pale and feminine, and Mrs. The group proceeds to drink excessively. Nick claims that he got drunk for only the second time in his life at this party.

The ostentatious behavior and conversation of the others at the party repulse Nick, and he tries to leave. At the same time, he finds himself fascinated by the lurid spectacle of the group.

Myrtle grows louder and more obnoxious the more she drinks, and shortly after Tom gives her a new puppy as a gift, she begins to talk about Daisy. Tom sternly warns her never to mention his wife. Tom responds by breaking her nose, bringing the party to an abrupt halt.

Nick leaves, drunkenly, with Mr. McKee, and ends up taking the 4 a.

The great gatsby from daisy s point

Analysis Unlike the other settings in the book, the valley of ashes is a picture of absolute desolation and poverty. It lacks a glamorous surface and lies fallow and gray halfway between West Egg and New York.

The valley of ashes symbolizes the moral decay hidden by the beautiful facades of the Eggs, and suggests that beneath the ornamentation of West Egg and the mannered charm of East Egg lies the same ugliness as in the valley.

The valley is created by industrial dumping and is therefore a by-product of capitalism. It is the home to the only poor characters in the novel. The undefined significance of Doctor T. The faded paint of the eyes can be seen as symbolizing the extent to which humanity has lost its connection to God.

The fourth and final setting of the novel, New York City, is in every way the opposite of the valley of ashes—it is loud, garish, abundant, and glittering.The Great Gatsby is written in first-person limited perspective from Nick’s point of view. This means that Nick uses the word “I” and describes events as he experienced them.

This means that Nick uses the word “I” and describes events as he experienced them. Point of view, or the vantage point from which a narrative is told, is generally divided into two different categories: First person point of view in which the story is told from the perspective.

A summary of Chapter 2 in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Great Gatsby and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. The Great Gatsby is a book very much of its feelthefish.coms will learn about life in New York during the Jazz Age (s), and about drinking behavior during Prohibition.

Also, the character Tom Buchanan converses about books he likes that represent bigoted views held by many whites at that time. And boy do we get stories: Gatsby's story, of course, but also Tom's story, Jordan's story, Daisy's story, and even the story of the Wilsons.

Ultimately, Nick's major character trait – reserving judgment – allows him to be almost an "invisible" narrator, similar to a traditional third-person omniscient point of view.

Daisy Is The Great Gatsby most “mysterious”, and perhaps also the most disappointing, character. She Is Just a selfish, low, and hurtful, woman. After marrying Tom, a rich man, she moves to East Egg, Long Island.

Daisy is a woman who likes to “play” with men, she loves to overstress and improvise.

What can be another point of view for The Great Gatsby? | eNotes